Advertisement

Mineral Resources: Arctic Alaska

  • Thomas P. Miller
Conference paper
  • 64 Downloads

Abstract

Exploration of the United States Arctic during the past century, at first largely by government agencies but increasingly by industry, has identified the existence of major resources of coal, zinc, lead, and copper as well as significant occurrences of oil shale, phosphate, gold, silver, and other commodities.1 The Arctic Slope coal deposits alone constitute a large part of the coal resources of the United States. The zinc-lead and copper deposits are sufficiently large that they may well influence the worldwide mining of these commodities in future years. These large mineral deposits of Arctic Alaska represent billions of dollars of commodities in the ground, but the area’s remoteness, harsh climate, and environmental and land status problems have been major obstacles to the exploitation of the region.

Keywords

Mineral Deposit United States Geological Survey National Wildlife Refuge Volcanogenic Massive Sulfide Coal Resource 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. I.L. Tailleur, “Lead, Zinc, and Barite-Bearing Samples from the Western Brooks Range,” U.S. Geological Survey Open-File Report 445, 1970.Google Scholar
  2. M.W. Hitzman, T.E. Smith, and J.M. Proffett, “Bedrock Geology of the Ambler District, Southwestern Brooks Range, Alaska,” Alaska Division of Geological and Geophysical Surveys, Geologic Report 75, 1982.Google Scholar
  3. Donald Grybeck, H. M. Beikman, W. P. Broseg, I. L. Tailleur, and C. G. Mull, “Geologic Map of the Brooks Range, Alaska,” U.S. Geological Survey Open-File Map 77-166-3, scale 1:1,000,000, 1977.Google Scholar
  4. F.F. Barnes, “Coal Resources of Alaska,” U.S. Geological Survey Bulletin 1242-B, 1967Google Scholar
  5. D.L. Mee, and K.S. Emmel, Alaska’s Coal Resources: Alaska Division of Geological and Geophysical Surveys, Individual Report, 1979.Google Scholar
  6. T.K. Bundtzen, G.R. Eakins, and C.N. Conwell, “Review of Alaska’s Mineral Resources,” Alaska Division of Geological and Geophysical Surveys, 1982, p. 9.Google Scholar
  7. W.J. Nokleberg, G. R. Winkler, “Stratiform Zinc-Lead Deposits in the Drenchwater Creek Area, Howard Pass Quadrangle, Northwestern Brooks Range, Alaska,” U.S. Geological Survey Professional Paper 1209, 1982.Google Scholar
  8. M.W. Hitzman, T.E. Smith, and J.M. Proffett, “Ambler Schist Belt of Northwest Alaska—Host Terrane for World Class Massive Sulfide Deposits: Western Alaska Geology and Resource Potential,” Alaska Geological Society Symposium Program, February 16–18, 1982, pp. 42–44.Google Scholar
  9. Travis Hudson, and J.H. Doung, Jr., “Map and Tables Describing Areas of Mineral Resource Potential, Seward Peninsula, Alaska,”U.S. Geological Survey Open-File Report 78–1-C, 1978.Google Scholar
  10. W.W. Patton Jr., and J. J. Matzko, “Phosphate Deposits in Northern Alaska,” U.S. Geological Survey Professional Paper 302-A, 1959.Google Scholar
  11. J.B. Cathcart, and R.A. Gulbrandsen, “Phosphate Deposits,” in United States Mineral Resources, D.A. Brobst and W.A. Pratt, eds., U.S. Geological Survey Professional Paper 820 (1973), pp. 515–526.Google Scholar
  12. J.R. Donnell, I.L. Tailleur, and H.A. Tourtelot, “Alaskan Oil Shale,” in Fourth Symposium on Oil Shale: Colorado School of Mines Quarterly, 62, no. 3 (1967), 39–43.Google Scholar
  13. G.R. Eakins, T.K. Bundtzen, M.S. Robinson, J.G. Clough, C.B. Green, K.H. Clautice, and M.A. Albanese, “Alaska’s Mineral Industry,” Alaska Office of Mineral Development and Alaska Division of Geological and Geophysical Surveys Special Report 31 (1982).Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag New York Inc. 1984

Authors and Affiliations

  • Thomas P. Miller
    • 1
  1. 1.Branch of Alaskan Geology, United States Geological SurveyUniversity of Minnesota, Stanford UniversityUSA

Personalised recommendations