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Knowledge in Numbers

  • Wilford W. Spradlin
  • Patricia B. Porterfield

Abstract

Using our ability to differentiate became one of our great passions. By using word tools, we began to differentiate or interrupt the continuum of being into discrete units. We dissected our world into blocks and then attempted to put the blocks back together again. The inclination to analyze, synthesize, to interrupt the continuum, is so pronounced that we might term it an innate human property. We see small children dissecting their new toys, sometimes with disastrous consequences, attempting to reduce them to the smallest possible units and then rebuilding them so that the parts at least resemble the original wholes.

Keywords

Cotton Cloth Internal Combustion Engine Heavenly Body Phlogiston Theory Mechanical World 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag New York Inc. 1984

Authors and Affiliations

  • Wilford W. Spradlin
    • 1
  • Patricia B. Porterfield
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Behavioral Medicine and PsychiatryUniversity of Virginia School of MedicineCharlottesvilleUSA

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