Social Processes, Biology, and Disease

  • Lawrence F. Van Egeren
Part of the Springer Series in Social Psychology book series (SSSOC)

Abstract

Sociophysiology is a field concerned with relating what happens socially between people to what happens physiologically inside them. Its roots lie in physiology, social science, human ethology, and medicine. Interactions in progress between social and biological systems are often monitored by means of noninvasive techniques. The goal is to study “traffic” on bridges connecting social and biological levels of organization without disturbing the flow.

Keywords

Steam Mold Cortisol Income Schizophrenia 

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  • Lawrence F. Van Egeren

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