Bacterial Reverse and Forward Mutation Assays

  • S. R. Haworth
Part of the Contemporary Biomedicine book series (CB, volume 4)

Abstract

The Salmonella/mammalian-microsome mutagenicity assay developed by Ames et al. (1,2) has proven to be a valuable tool for the rapid detection of potential genetic activity in a wide variety of chemical classes. For general mutagenicity screening purposes, five tester strains are routinely used: TA1535, TA1537, TA1538, TA98, and TA100. These strains possess mutations of the histidine operon, making them dependent upon the presence of histidine in the medium of growth. Mutagenesis is detected as the reversion of these strains to histidine prototrophy on selective medium.

Keywords

Toxicity Agar NADPH Tryptophan Histidine 

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Copyright information

© The HAMANA Press Inc. 1984

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  • S. R. Haworth

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