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Peer Perceptions, Aggression, and the Development of Peer Relations

  • Kenneth A. Dodge
  • Beverly A. Richard

Abstract

In a chapter on aggression in the Handbook of Child Psychology, Ross Parke and Ron Slaby (1983) criticize researchers for treating aggression as an isolated unit of behavior under scientific scrutiny, without regard to the social and ecological context in which it occurs. This chapter is an attempt to broaden the prevailing research perspective by placing children’s aggression into its interpersonal context. First, we review the evidence concerning the peer relations of aggressive children. We examine the social cognitions by peers about a child’s aggressive behavior, including the role of aggression in peers’ liking for a child. This review also focuses on the factors contributing to the development of aggression and poor peer relations over time. Next, we examine the social cognitions by aggressive children about their peers and propose a reciprocal influence model of the relation between social cognition and aggressive behavior. This model emphasizes hostile attributional biases and deficient problem-solving abilities by aggressive children. Finally, we also consider several of the factors involved in the development of these cognitive biases.

Keywords

Aggressive Behavior Aggressive Child Social Rejection Hostile Intent Sociometric Status 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag New York Inc. 1985

Authors and Affiliations

  • Kenneth A. Dodge
  • Beverly A. Richard

There are no affiliations available

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