Behavior of Herbicides in Irrigated Soils

  • B. Yaron
  • Z. Gerstl
  • W. F. Spencer
Part of the Advances in Soil Science book series (SOIL, volume 3)

Abstract

The primary function of herbicides is to protect agricultural crops from infestation with weeds and to prevent arable land from being overgrown by plant cover indigenous to the ecosystem. The chemicals known as herbicides are mainly synthetic organic compounds with broad molecular configurations having as a common property the ability of selectively killing or inhibiting the growth of plants. A selective herbicide retards growth or kills one plant species (the weed), whereas another plant species (the crop) is unaffected by the same treatment

Keywords

Carbamate Oryzalin DCPA Bromoxynil Pyridazinone 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag New York Inc. 1985

Authors and Affiliations

  • B. Yaron
    • 1
  • Z. Gerstl
    • 1
  • W. F. Spencer
    • 2
  1. 1.Institute of Soils and WaterThe Volcani CenterBet-DaganIsrael
  2. 2.Agricultural Research Service Soil and Environmental Science Department, UCRUSDARiversideUSA

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