Is Rehabilitation a Legitimate Intervention for the Elderly? Goals and Expectations

  • Stanley J. Brody
Conference paper

Summary

Operating within a context of therapeutic optimism the field of rehabilitation helps restore patients to their optimum physical, psychological, and social function as measured by their ability to perform activities of daily living, their mobility, and their state of mind. After reviewing the demographic trends and historical events which have affected the parallel development of rehabilitation and gerontology, this chapter discusses the challenges being posed to the field of rehabilitation by three subgroups of the elderly: the developmentally disabled, adults who have suffered earlier traumas, and the disabled aged, especially the “old-old.”

Keywords

Assure Washing Glean 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag New York Inc. 1985

Authors and Affiliations

  • Stanley J. Brody

There are no affiliations available

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