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Interaction of Trace Amines with Serotonin Recognition Sites in Rat Brain

  • R. A. Locock
  • G. B. Baker
  • R. T. Coutts
  • W. G. Dewhurst
  • T. T. S. Liu

Abstract

The “trace” amines such as 2-phenylethylamine, m-and p-tyramine and tryptamine accumulate in brain after administration of monoamine oxidase inhibitor antidepressant drugs (Boulton and Juorio, 1982). Accumulated quantities of these substances, in addition to having effects by themselves, may have important interactions with neurotransmitter receptor systems. In the study reported here we have examined the in vitro interactions of these trace amines with serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine; 5-HT) recognition sites (5-HT1 and 5-HT2) of rat cerebral cortex. Modulation of serotonin receptors by the central neurotransmitter, norepinephrine, has been recognized recently (Scott and Crews, 1985); the trace amines also may have important interactions with the serotonin receptors.

Keywords

Serotonin Receptor Hill Plot Trace Amine Creatinine Sulfate Paired Sample Analysis 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© The Humana Press Inc. 1985

Authors and Affiliations

  • R. A. Locock
    • 1
  • G. B. Baker
    • 1
  • R. T. Coutts
    • 1
  • W. G. Dewhurst
    • 1
  • T. T. S. Liu
    • 1
  1. 1.Neurochemical Research Unit, Faculty of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences and Department of PsychiatryUniversity of AlbertaEdmontonCanada

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