Human T Cell Lymphotropic Viruses and Their Family of Diseases

  • L. Ratner
  • Robert C. Gallo

Abstract

Three classes of exogenous human retroviruses have been isolated, and designated human T-cell lymphotropic virus (HTLV) types I, II, and III. HTLV-I and -II are immortalizing and weakly cytopathic viruses, whereas HTLV-III is a nonimmortalizing, strongly cytopathic virus. HTLV-I is etiologically related to adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATLL). HTLV-III is the cause of the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). HTLV-II has been isolated on three occasions, from patients with a T cell variant of hairy cell leukemia, an intravenous drug abuser, and a hemophiliac. Because of the rarity of its detection, no clear disease association has been established for HTLV-II.

Keywords

Lymphoma Codon Leukemia Lysine Tral 

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. 1.
    Robert-Guroff M, Sarngadharan NG, Gallo RC (1982) T-cell growth factor. In Growth and Maturation Factors. Wiley & Sons, New York, pp 267–309Google Scholar
  2. 1.
    Robert-Guroff M, Sarngadharan NG, Gallo RC (1982) T-cell growth factor. In Growth and Maturation Factors. Wiley & Sons, New York, pp 267–309Google Scholar
  3. 3.
    Gallo RC (1984) Human T-cell leukemia-lymphoma virus and T cell malignancies in adults. Cancer Surveys 3: 113–159Google Scholar
  4. 4.
    Wong-Staal F, Gallo RC (1985) The family of human T-lymphotropic leukemia viruses: HTLV-I as the cause of adult T-cell leukemia and HTLV-III as the cause of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome. Blood 65: 253–267PubMedGoogle Scholar
  5. 5.
    Wong-Staal F, Gallo RC (1985) Human T-lymphotropic retroviruses (HTLV). Nature 317: 395–403PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1986

Authors and Affiliations

  • L. Ratner
  • Robert C. Gallo

There are no affiliations available

Personalised recommendations