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Virus-induced Autoimmune Demyelinating Disease of the Central Nervous System

  • Richard T. Johnson
  • Diane E. Griffin

Abstract

Acute perivenular demyelinating disease of the brain and spinal cord can complicate a number of human viral infections. It has been most frequent late in the course of the exanthematous viral infections, particularly measles and vaccinia, and, to a lesser extent, varicella and rubella. The discontinuation of vaccination against smallpox and the successful immunization against measles and rubella in the United States have decreased the incidences of these infections and their parainfectious complications. Currently, postinfectious encephalomyelitis in the United States is most frequent after varicella, where mortality and morbidity rates are low, and after upper respiratory infections, where the etiologic agent is usually undetermined [1].

Keywords

Myelin Basic Protein Demyelinating Disease Experimental Allergic Encephalomyelitis Recombinant Vaccinia Virus Measle Virus Infection 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1986

Authors and Affiliations

  • Richard T. Johnson
  • Diane E. Griffin

There are no affiliations available

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