Postharvest fungal decay control chemicals: Treatments and residues in citrus fruits

  • David J. Dezman
  • Steven Nagy
  • G. Eldon Brown
Conference paper
Part of the Residue Reviews book series (RECT, volume 97)

Abstract

Fresh citrus fruit is a most appealing and healthful food that many people pay a premium to enjoy. Most consumers take for granted the availability of fresh, high quality grapefruit, oranges, and specialty fruits. The per capita consumption of fresh citrus fruit in the United States in 1983 was 14.4 kg (Florida Crop and Livestock Reporting Service 1984)

Keywords

Mold Cyclohexane Thiourea Trichloroethane Soda Lime 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag New York Inc. 1986

Authors and Affiliations

  • David J. Dezman
    • 1
  • Steven Nagy
    • 1
  • G. Eldon Brown
    • 1
  1. 1.Scientific Research DepartmentFlorida Department of Citrus, Citrus Research and Education CenterLake AlfredUSA

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