Skill Learning And Human Factors: A Brief Overview

  • K. M. Newell
Part of the Recent Research in Psychology book series (PSYCHOLOGY)

Abstract

This paper provides a brief overview of the field of motor learning and control as it relates to the acquisition of skill in the human factors domain. The impact of learning variables on skill acquisition is critically assessed together with the more current literature on behavioral motor control. The potential impact of the ecological approach to perception and action in man-machine systems is outlined.

Keywords

Glean Banner 

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References

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag New York Inc. 1987

Authors and Affiliations

  • K. M. Newell
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Physical EducationUniversity of IllinoisUrbana-ChampaignUSA

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