Process Mnemonics: Principles, Prospects, and Problems

  • Kenneth L. Higbee

Abstract

Research interest in mnemonics has been continually increasing since the 1960s. Until about the mid-1970s, most research focused on whether mnemonics really worked and how well they worked. Recent research has focused more on how and why mnemonics work, and on ways they can be applied. Some of the large amount of mnemonics research has been summarized elsewhere in this volume, as well as in a number of recent reviews (e. g., Bellezza, 1981, 1984; Higbee, 1979; Levin, 1985a; Pressley, Levin, & Delaney, 1982). The research has typically investigated what might be called “fact” mnemonics, mnemonics that are used on a one to one basis to remember facts—one mnemonic association for each item to be remembered. For example, the rhyme, “In fourteen hundred and ninety two, Columbus sailed the ocean blue,” can help us remember when Columbus discovered America; the acronym, “HOMES,” can help us remember the names of the five Great Lakes; and the association “pato-pot-duck” can help us remember the Spanish word for “duck.” These mnemonics, however, are not useful for remembering information other than these specific facts.

Keywords

Beach Expense Tated Dial Metaphor 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag New York Inc. 1987

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  • Kenneth L. Higbee

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