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Development of Elaboration and Organization in Different Socioeconomic-Status and Ethnic Populations

  • Susan Nakayama Siaw
  • Daniel W. Kee

Abstract

This chapter provides a review of studies that have compared the development of mnemonic strategies in the learning and memory of different American ethnic and socioeconomic-status (SES) populations. During the past 20 years, there has been substantial growth in memory development research. Although reviews of this literature frequently provide analyses of memory development in different cultures (see Kail & Hagen, 1977; Pressley & Brainerd, 1985), American subcultural groups are rarely considered in these reviews (see Kail & Hagen, 1982, for an exception). Thus, this chapter augments extant reviews of the memory development literature by synthesizing comparative studies of mnemonic strategy development in American subcultural populations.

Keywords

Free Recall Educational Psychology Proactive Interference Population Difference White Child 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag New York Inc. 1987

Authors and Affiliations

  • Susan Nakayama Siaw
  • Daniel W. Kee

There are no affiliations available

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