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Quasigeostrophic Motion of a Stratified Fluid on a Sphere

Chapter

Abstract

In Chapter 1 it was noted that variations in density which arise from the differential heating of the atmosphere and oceans are responsible for the circulations of both systems. Even the wind-driven oceanic circulation implicitly requires atmospheric buoyancy forces to produce the wind. In addition, the presence of a stable stratification in which heavier fluid underlies lighter, characteristic of both the atmosphere and the oceans, inhibits vertical motion and strongly affects the nature of the dynamics. It is also clear from the discussion in Section 2.9 that the vertical structure of the winds and currents is directly related to the presence and strength of horizontal density gradients by the thermal wind relation.

Keywords

Rossby Wave Potential Vorticity Synoptic Scale Western Boundary Current Ekman Layer 
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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag New York Inc. 1987

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Woods Hole Oceanographic InstitutionWoods HoleUSA

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