Trace Amines pp 379-386 | Cite as

Decreased Tyramine Conjugation in Melancholia: A Trait Marker

  • Thomas B. Cooper
  • Wilma M. Harrison
  • Jonathan W. Stewart
  • Donald F. Klein
Part of the Experimental and Clinical Neuroscience book series (ECN)

Abstract

Detailed accounts of the investigation of a tyramine conjugate deficit as a trait marker for depressive illness can be found in a review by Sandler et al. (1984) and papers by Harrison et al. (1984) and Hale et al. (1986).

Keywords

Placebo Hydrolysis HPLC Ethyl Phenol 

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References

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Copyright information

© The Humana Press Inc. 1988

Authors and Affiliations

  • Thomas B. Cooper
    • 1
    • 2
  • Wilma M. Harrison
    • 1
    • 2
  • Jonathan W. Stewart
    • 1
    • 2
  • Donald F. Klein
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.New York State Psychiatric InstituteNew YorkUSA
  2. 2.Nathan Kline InstituteOrangeburgUSA

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