Developmental Changes in Lymantria Dispar (L.) Prothoracicotropic Hormone Activity from Embryo to Adult

  • Edward P. Masler
  • Thomas J. Kelly
  • Belgaum S. Thyagaraja
  • Robert A. Bell
  • Dale B. Gelman
  • Richard B. Imberski
  • Alexej B. Borkovec
Part of the Experimental and Clinical Neuroscience book series (ECN)

Abstract

Prothoracicotropic hormone (PTTH) in the brains of fifth instar Lymantria dispar larvae (Kelly et al., 1986; Masler et al., 1986) is presumably the factor(s) postulated by Kopec (1922) to control metamorphosis in L. dispar. We have extended our studies on L. dispar PTTH to other developmental stages (Masler et al., 1988) and now report PTTH activity in embryonic through adult tissue (see also Bell et al., Kelly et al, Thyagaraja et al., this volume). Embryonic PTTH has been reported for both Bombyx mori (Chen et al., 1986, 1987; Fugo et al., 1987) and Manduca sexta (Dorn et al, 1987) and developmental stage-related activation of M. sexta prothoracic glands (PGs) in vitro has been observed (Bollenbacher et al., 1984).

Keywords

Boiling Kelly Ecdysone 

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References

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Copyright information

© The Humana Press Inc. 1990

Authors and Affiliations

  • Edward P. Masler
    • 1
  • Thomas J. Kelly
    • 1
  • Belgaum S. Thyagaraja
    • 2
    • 3
  • Robert A. Bell
    • 1
  • Dale B. Gelman
    • 1
  • Richard B. Imberski
    • 3
  • Alexej B. Borkovec
    • 1
  1. 1.Insect Reproduction LaboratoryUSDA, ARSBeltsvilleUSA
  2. 2.Central Silk BoardRSRSC.R. NagarIndia
  3. 3.Department of ZoologyUniversity of MarylandUSA

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