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Current Religious Perspectives on the New Reproductive Techniques

  • Baruch Brody
Chapter
Part of the Contemporary Issues in Biomedicine, Ethics, and Society book series (CIBES)

Abstract

The publication of the Office of Technology Assessment’s major report entitled Infertility: Medical and Social Choices 1 constitutes a major contribution to our understanding of the many issues surrounding the treatment of infertility. Of special significance is its treatment of the ethical and religious considerations relevant to the new reproductive techniques. In this essay, I want to elaborate upon that treatment. My goals are to identify the major concerns about these techniques shared by many of America’s religious communities and to discuss the implications of the existence of these concerns for the formulation of public policy in this area.

Keywords

Married Couple Artificial Insemination Religious Community Reproductive Technique Donor Sperm 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

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Copyright information

© The Humana Press Inc. 1990

Authors and Affiliations

  • Baruch Brody

There are no affiliations available

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