Fluidization of Soft Estuarine Mud by Waves

  • Mark A. Ross
  • Ashish J. Mehta
Part of the Frontiers in Sedimentary Geology book series (SEDIMENTARY)

Abstract

The interaction between waves and soft muddy bottoms, a key process in governing estuarine and lacustrine cohesive sediment transport, is at present not well understood. What is quite well known, however, is that waves are significantly important in generating fluid mud, a high concentration near-bed slurry, which thereby becomes potentially available for transport by tidal currents. It follows that the precise mechanism by which fluid mud is formed by wave action over cohesive, porous solid beds is of evident interest in understanding and interpreting the microfabric of flow-deposited fine sediments in shallow waters. Results from preliminary laboratory tests described using known soil mechanical principles shed some light along these lines, and suggest that the fluidization process may be even more significant in generating potentially transportable sediment than previously realized.

Keywords

Clay Beach Turbidity Advection Trench 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag New York Inc. 1991

Authors and Affiliations

  • Mark A. Ross
  • Ashish J. Mehta

There are no affiliations available

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