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Long-Term Vegetation Trends: A History

  • Stanley A. Nichols
  • Richard C. Lathrop
  • Stephen R. Carpenter
Part of the Springer Series on Environmental Management book series (SSEM)

Abstract

Littoral zone vegetation is integral to the fish productivity of lakes and their capacity to support waterfowl. The refuge for small fishes provided by macrophyte beds alters predator-prey interactions in ways that directly affect productivity of sport fish (Crowder and Cooper 1982; Savino and Stein 1982; Wiley et al. 1984). Different plant species support varying number of macroinvertebrates that are prey for fish and waterfowl (Lathrop, Ch. 10). Over the past century the vegetation of Lake Mendota has undergone substantial changes with significant implications for water quality and fish populations. Valuable clues to the potential consequences of future changes in the macrophyte community can be derived from an understanding of these historical changes.

Keywords

Standing Crop Filamentous Alga Macrophyte Community Myriophyllum Spicatum Ceratophyllum Demersum 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag New York Inc. 1992

Authors and Affiliations

  • Stanley A. Nichols
  • Richard C. Lathrop
  • Stephen R. Carpenter

There are no affiliations available

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