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Nutrient Loadings, Lake Nutrients, and Water Clarity

  • Richard C. Lathrop
Part of the Springer Series on Environmental Management book series (SSEM)

Abstract

Nutrient loadings and lake water quality are inextricably linked. Excessive loadings of nitrogen and, particularly, phosphorus cause lakes to become eutrophic and often to exhibit noxious algal blooms (Vollenweider 1968; Schindler 1977). While the role of nutrients in lake eutrophication is widely accepted, the ability of zooplankton such as Daphnia to graze algae and thus ameliorate water quality problems is less certain for eutrophic lakes (McQueen 1990). Because blue-green algae can be inedible, eutrophic lakes that have excessive summer blue-green algal blooms may not respond to fish population manipulations that have produced “top-down” responses in less eutrophic lakes (Carpenter, Ch. 23; Gulati et al. 1990; Elser and Goldman 1991).

Keywords

Water Clarity Secchi Disk Spring Runoff Surface Water Concentration Disk Reading 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag New York Inc. 1992

Authors and Affiliations

  • Richard C. Lathrop

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