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Lake Mendota and the Yahara River Chain

  • Richard C. Lathrop
Part of the Springer Series on Environmental Management book series (SSEM)

Abstract

Lake Mendota is located near Madison (Dane County) in south central Wisconsin, USA (43°6′N, 89°24′W). It is the uppermost lake in the Yahara River chain of lakes, which also include Lakes Monona, Waubesa, and Kegonsa (Figure 3.1; Plate 2). After leaving Lake Kegonsa, the Yahara River drains south to the Rock River, which is tributary to the Missisippi River.

Keywords

Road Salt Lake Surface Area Wisconsin Department Dane County Magnesian Limestone 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag New York Inc. 1992

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  • Richard C. Lathrop

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