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Benefits on a Larger Scale

  • Michael D. Staggs
Part of the Springer Series on Environmental Management book series (SSEM)

Abstract

One of the most troublesome questions raised by the Lake Mendota project has been whether the expenditure of $1.2 million dollars over the study period has been rewarded with commensurate benefits for state aquatic management programs. The Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources (WDNR) Bureau of Fisheries Management, which initiated and funded the bulk of the project, has been consistently questioned by the public, the department administration, legislators, and even biologists within our own program about the cost/benefit ratio of this project. Critics are concerned with the high apparent cost and resulting trade-off in other more traditional management functions, the large number of fish stocked into one lake at the presumed expense of stocking programs in other areas of the state, perceived favorithism in selection of a study lake in the State Capitol area, and the validity of project goals and objectives, particularly those relating to potential improvements in water quality.

Keywords

Fishery Management None None Largemouth Bass Northern Pike Smallmouth Bass 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag New York Inc. 1992

Authors and Affiliations

  • Michael D. Staggs

There are no affiliations available

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