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The Fishery

  • Brett M. Johnson
  • Michael D. Staggs
Part of the Springer Series on Environmental Management book series (SSEM)

Abstract

Lake Mendota has been a popular fishing lake throughout the twentieth century (Plate 7). Historically, the fishery has been supported primarily by planktivorous fishes. Well known for its perch fishing since the turn of the century, Lake Mendota was even considered the perch capital of the Midwest in the 1950s (Lathrop et al., in press). Walleye were never very abundant, but northern pike sustained an excellent game fishery until recently. Over the past 30 years, habitat degradation, liberal harvest regulations, and sporadic stocking have made northern pike and walleye stocks unstable. By the late 1980s, perch fishing was still moderately good, but game fish stocks were low, with generally poor game fishing oppurtunities.

Keywords

Largemouth Bass Fishing Effort Yellow Perch Catch Rate Northern Pike 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag New York Inc. 1992

Authors and Affiliations

  • Brett M. Johnson
  • Michael D. Staggs

There are no affiliations available

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