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Piscivores and Their Prey

  • Brett M. Johnson
  • Stephen J. Gilbert
  • R. Scot Stewart
  • Lars G. Rudstam
  • Yvonne Allen
  • Don M. Fago
  • David Dreikosen
Part of the Springer Series on Environmental Management book series (SSEM)

Abstract

Not suprisingly, Lake Mendota’s fishes have been the subject of a multitude of studies since the days of Birge and Juday. However, these studies have focused almost entirely on yellow perch (Perca flavescens), white bass (Morone chrysops), and cisco (Coregonus artedii), probably because of their abundance or importance to the fishery. When this study began, relatively little was known about Lake Mendota’s piscivore community, including abundance, reproductive success, growth rates, diet, and distribution. Hence, we had some fundamental questions that needed to be addressed before we could predict the course of the biomanipulation experiment.

Keywords

Largemouth Bass Yellow Perch Northern Pike Smallmouth Bass Oneida Lake 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag New York Inc. 1992

Authors and Affiliations

  • Brett M. Johnson
  • Stephen J. Gilbert
  • R. Scot Stewart
  • Lars G. Rudstam
  • Yvonne Allen
  • Don M. Fago
  • David Dreikosen

There are no affiliations available

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