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The Role of Account-Making in the Growth and Deterioration of Close Relationships

  • Sally Planalp
  • Catherine A. Surra

Abstract

A relationship changes and becomes closer or less close primarily because one or both partners let it change. To one person, a disagreement about politics might be a sign of serious incompatibility; to someone else, it might mean nothing. To one person, breaking a confidence might be a small mistake to be overlooked; to another person, it might signal a gross violation of trust. Each person must decide what events are relevant to the relationship, why the events occurred, and what implications they have for the relationship. In this way, people’s perceptions and interpretations of events affect their judgments and beliefs about the relationship, and ultimately what actions they take. This chapter concerns the types of events that partners believe are responsible for important changes in their relationships, the processes through which they account for the events, and the effects on relational assessments. By relational assessments we mean the qualities people ascribe to a particular close relationship, such as love, commitment, trust, satisfaction, and the like (Surra & Bohman, in press).

Keywords

Personal Relationship Marital Satisfaction Romantic Partner Relational Schema Relational Knowledge 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag New York Inc. 1992

Authors and Affiliations

  • Sally Planalp
  • Catherine A. Surra

There are no affiliations available

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