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Cross-Cultural Factors Affecting Initial Acquisition of Literacy Among Children and Adults

  • JoBeth Allen
  • Donald L. Rubin
Part of the Recent Research in Psychology book series (PSYCHOLOGY)

Abstract

In an absorption center situated on the grounds of a youth hostel overlooking the Mediterranean, a group of Ethiopian immigrants to Israel struggle during the summer and fall of 1985 to learn to read and write in Hebrew. Along with thousands of others, they are refugees from a deadly famine in their native land. Airlifted 10 months earlier from camps in neighboring Sudan, they are removed from their Third World subsistence life styles and deposited with the speed of jet transports into a technologically advanced society.

Keywords

Literacy Instruction Oral Language Reading Instruction Writing System Emergent Literacy 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag New York, Inc. 1993

Authors and Affiliations

  • JoBeth Allen
    • 1
  • Donald L. Rubin
    • 1
  1. 1.Scenarios of Literacy Acquisition in Diverse CulturesHaifaIsrael

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