Advertisement

Community and Vocational Re-Entry in Minor Head Injury

  • Karen Lutz
  • Lynn Nash

Abstract

Minor head injury often has a significant impact on an individual’s life-style as well as that of family members. The injury affects the areas that are crucial to an individual’s definition of self, an individual’s employment, activities of daily living, life skills, and social and leisure activities. Rimel’s study (1) found that 34% of the patients who were gainfully employed prior to an injury were unemployed three months later. The same study revealed that 14% of the patients stated they had difficulty with household chores and activities of daily living. An additional 15% “complained of changes in transportation” such as “no longer feeling competent to drive.”

Keywords

Functional Task Neuropsychological Test Battery Memory Skill Minor Head Injury Minor Head Trauma 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. 1.
    Rimel RW, Giordani B, Barth JT, Boll TJ, Jane JA: Disability caused by minor head injury. Neurosurgery, 1981; 9(3):221–228.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. 2.
    Alves WM, et al.: Understanding post-traumatic sysmptoms after minor head injury. J Head Trauma Rehabil, 1986; 1(2): 1–12.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. 3.
    Barth JT, et al.: Forensic aspects of mild head trauma. J Head Trauma Rehabil, 1986; l(2):63–70.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. 4.
    Gronwal D, Wrightson P: Delayed recovery of intellectual function after minor head injury. Lancet, 1974; Sept 14:605–609.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  5. 5.
    Gronwal D, Wrightson P: Memory and information processing capacity after closed head injury. J Neurol Neurosurg Psychiatry, 1981; 44:889–895.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  6. 6.
    Kay T: Minor Head Injury: An Introduction for Professionals. Framingham, MA: National Head Injury Foundation, 1986.Google Scholar
  7. 7.
    American Occupational Therapy Association: Uniform terminology for Occupational Therapy, 2nd ed. Am J Occupa Ther, 1989; 43(12):808–815.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  8. 8.
    Morse P: Brain Injury: Cognitive and Prevocational Approaches to Rehabilitation. New York: The Tiresias Press Inc., 1986.Google Scholar
  9. 9.
    Toglia J: Approaches to cognitive assessment of the brain injured adult: traditional methods and dynamic investigation. Occup Ther Practice 1989; 1(1):36–55.Google Scholar
  10. 10.
    Bracy OL: Cognitive Rehabilitation Program: Foundation I. Indianapolis: Psychological Software Services, Inc., 1987.Google Scholar
  11. 11.
    Bracy OL: Cognitive Rehabilitation Program: Foundation II. Indianapolis: Psychological Software Services, Inc., 1987.Google Scholar
  12. 12.
    Bracy OL: Cognitive Rehabilitation Program: Problem Solving. Indianapolis: Psychological Software Services, Inc., 1987.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1993

Authors and Affiliations

  • Karen Lutz
  • Lynn Nash

There are no affiliations available

Personalised recommendations