Integrating Different Knowledge Spaces

  • Cornelia E. Dowling
Part of the Recent Research in Psychology book series (PSYCHOLOGY)

Abstract

Knowledge spaces on a set of items from a given branch of knowledge are structures for the assessment of students’ or pupils’ knowledge. In recent studies, knowledge spaces have been derived from the judgments of teachers. In analyzing the data, the problem arises that different experts have different opinions and may therefore yield different knowledge spaces on the same set of items. The problem of integrating knowledge spaces from different experts into a common knowledge space is addressed. This common space represents opinions on which the experts agree.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag New York, Inc. 1994

Authors and Affiliations

  • Cornelia E. Dowling
    • 1
  1. 1.Institut für PsychologieTechnische Universität BraunschweigBraunschweigGermany

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