Advertisement

Concluding Remarks at the Second Annual Conference on Attribution and Personality Theory

  • Edward E. Jones
Conference paper
Part of the Recent Research in Psychology book series (PSYCHOLOGY)

Abstract

Although I was spared the task of preparing a paper for this conference, I have asked Dr. Zelen if I could have a few moments to make some general remarks. First, I would like to express my deep appreciation for the kind words that have been said about the various aspects of my career in social psychology. Since I have always considered myself a student of the role of vanity in human affairs, I can hardly pretend that such remarks were truly embarrassing. In fact, my own research on ingratiation should tell you that, since I have convinced myself that you have nothing to gain from me, I should be inclined to believe your kind words even though they are obviously not true.

Keywords

Depressive Affect Feeling State Professional Psychology Situational Selection Kind Word 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. Berglas, S. (1986). The Three Faces of Self-Handicapping: Protective Self-Presentation, A Strategy for Self-Esteem Enhancement and a Character Disorder. Paper presented at the Second Attribution-Personality Theory Conference, California School of Professional Psychology, Los Angeles.Google Scholar
  2. Berglas, S. and Jones, E. E. (1978). Drug choice as a self-handicapping strategy in response to noncontingent success. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 36, 495–517.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. Jones, E. E. and Pittman, T. S. (1978). Toward a general theory of strategic self-presentation. In J. Suls (Ed.), Psychological perspectives on the self (Vol. 1 ). Hillsdale, NJ: Erlbaum.Google Scholar
  4. Jones, E. E. and Rhodewalt, F. (1982). A self-handicapping scale. Available from the authors. (Dept. of Psychology, Princeton University or Dept. of Psychology, University of Virginia, respectively).Google Scholar
  5. Jones, E. E., Wood, G. and Quattrone, G. (1981). Perceived variability of personality characteristics in in-groups and out-groups: The role of knowledge and evaluation. Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin, 7, 523–528.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  6. Kolditz, T. A. and Arkin, R. M. (1982). An impression management of the self-handicapping strategy. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 43, 492–502.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  7. Rhodewalt, F., Saltzman, A. T. and Wittmer, J. (1984). Self-handicapping among competitive athletes. The role of practice in self-esteem protection. Basic and Applied Social Psychology, 5, 197–210.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  8. Weary, G. (1986). Depression and Self-Presentation. Paper presented at the Second Attribution-Personality Theory Conference, California School of Professional Psychology, Los Angeles.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag New York Inc. 1988

Authors and Affiliations

  • Edward E. Jones
    • 1
  1. 1.Princeton UniversityUSA

Personalised recommendations