cis-1,2-Dichloroethylene

  • George W. Ware
Part of the Reviews of Environmental Contamination and Toxicology book series (RECT, volume 106)

Abstract

cis-1,2-Dichloroethylene, also known as 1,2-DCE, cis-1,2-DCE, acetylene di-chloride, and 1,2-dichloroethene, is used in a mixture with the trans-1,2-isomer as a captive intermediate in the manufacture of other chlorinated solvents. Its structure and properties are shown in Table I.

Keywords

Chlorinate Acetylene Aeration Biotransformation Toxicology 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag New York Inc. 1988

Authors and Affiliations

  • George W. Ware
    • 1
  1. 1.College of Agriculture, University of ArizonaTusconUSA

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