Predictive Models for Sliding Wear

  • Said Jahanmir
Conference paper

Abstract

Wear is defined as “damage to a solid surface, generally involving progressive loss of material due to relative motion between that surface and a contacting substance or substances” [1]. Examination of worn machine elements indicates that the wear process is rather complex and can occur by various mechanisms [2]. Wear can be regarded as the result of the surface being stressed mechanically, thermally, chemically, or electrically. These processes may occur independently or simultaneously to cause material removal. When two surfaces are rubbed together, in the absence of any foreign abrasive particles, the wear process is classified as “sliding wear.” In sliding wear, various processes can operate to generate wear particles.

Keywords

Fatigue Hydrocarbon Assure Plowing 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag New York Inc. 1988

Authors and Affiliations

  • Said Jahanmir

There are no affiliations available

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