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A Proposed Model for The Development of High Temperature Fluids for Lubrication of Ceramics

  • David A. Dalman
Conference paper

Abstract

The following discussion will attempt to outline a plan for overcoming at least one current impasse in the utilization of engineering ceramics in high temperature sliding contacts and illustrate the possible role of the synthetic chemist coupled with other disciplines in designing new and effective tribological systems.

Keywords

Lubricant Basestock Solid Lubricant Bond Dissociation Energy Ceramic Surface Subcritical Crack Growth 
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References

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag New York Inc. 1988

Authors and Affiliations

  • David A. Dalman

There are no affiliations available

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