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The Interfaces Between Sociobiology and Developmental Psychology

  • Kevin B. MacDonald

Abstract

This chapter is intended as an introduction to the field of developmental human sociobiology. Its basic purpose is to describe the history of recent evolutionary thought and to illustrate some of the potential contributions to developmental psychology to be gained from a rapprochement with evolutionary theory. In addition, there will be an attempt to integrate the theoretical and empirical research traditions of developmental psychology within an evolutionary framework.

Keywords

Human Behavior Social Learning Social Control Contextual Variable Social Learning Theory 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag New York Inc. 1988

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  • Kevin B. MacDonald

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