Families and the Developmental Needs of Dually Diagnosed Children

  • Paul R. Dokecki
  • Craig Anne Heflinger
Part of the Disorders of Human Learning, Behavior, and Communication book series (HUMAN LEARNING)

Abstract

Dually diagnosed children represent a major psychoeducational and biomedical problem for the nation. All known prevalence research on the topic has shown that children with mental retardation have higher rates of psychopathology—perhaps as much as five to six times higher—than in the population as a whole (Matson & Frame, 1985). These findings are striking since intellectual impairment often diagnostically overshadows psychopathology in children with mental retardation. Despite the extensive prevalence of coexisting intellectual and emotional problems, however, the dually diagnosed are grossly underserved in the United States (Reiss, Levitan, & McNally, 1982). Although we accept the validity of the claimed high rates of mental retardation joined with psychopathology, and of attendant unmet developmental needs, we believe that a longstanding conceptual problem has impeded meaningful address to the issue.

Keywords

Transportation Income Peri Nash Sonal 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag New York Inc. 1988

Authors and Affiliations

  • Paul R. Dokecki
  • Craig Anne Heflinger

There are no affiliations available

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