Integrative Approach to Diagnosis of Mental Disorders in Retarded Persons

  • Ludwik S. Szymanski
Part of the Disorders of Human Learning, Behavior, and Communication book series (HUMAN LEARNING)

Abstract

The fact that retarded persons exhibit mental disorders even more frequently than nonretarded ones has been well documented in the literature reviewed by Dr. Russell in Chapter 3. As pointed out by him, as well as by other writers (Szymanski, 1980), one of the major obstacles to progress in the field of mental health of persons with mental retardation has been the lack of clear and universally accepted diagnostic terminology of mental disorders.

Keywords

Depression Lithium Dementia Schizophrenia Dexamethasone 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag New York Inc. 1988

Authors and Affiliations

  • Ludwik S. Szymanski

There are no affiliations available

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