Horses and Ponies as Animal Models for Malignant Hyperthermia

  • Susan V. Hildebrand

Abstract

The equine species, including horses and ponies, can develop myopathy associated with stress, exercise, or general anesthesia. A variety of possible causes exist, and increasing evidence indicates that malignant hyperthermia (MH) plays a role. Identification of MH susceptible (MHS) horses is important to the horse industry from both a performance and breeding standpoint, to the equine anesthesiologist, and for basic research as a new and potentially useful experimental model for further study of MH and its species variations.

Keywords

Fatigue Ischemia Half Life Choline Hypothyroidism 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag New York Inc. 1988

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  • Susan V. Hildebrand

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