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Retinitis Pigmentosa

  • Keith M. Zinn

Abstract

Retinitis pigmentosa is a progressive primary pigmentary dystrophy of the retina characterized by a collection of bone spicule-shaped pigment located in the midperiphery of the retina, a marked narrowing of the retinal arterioles, night blindness, altered dark adaptation, a diminished electroretinogram, and constricted visual fields (ring scotomas). The retinal veins appear normal in retinitis pigmentosa, as do the optic nerve heads and the maculae initially. However, as the disease progresses, optic pallor (waxy) usually will develop and in some cases cystoid macular edema with macular atrophy also will be present.

Keywords

Retinitis Pigmentosa Optic Nerve Head Optic Atrophy Cystoid Macular Edema Night Blindness 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Keith M. Zinn and Springer-Verlag New York Inc. 1988

Authors and Affiliations

  • Keith M. Zinn
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of OphthalmologyMount Sinai School of MedicineNew YorkUSA
  2. 2.Manhattan Eye, Ear, and Throat HospitalNew YorkUSA

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