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Cancer Education Programs

  • Noma L. Roberson
Chapter
  • 27 Downloads

Abstract

The disproportionately severe impact of cancer on certain minority groups in the United States, particularly Black Americans, suggests that cancer is a major health problem in these groups that warrants attention. This is suggested by national data that show Black Americans, the largest minority group in the United States, experience the highest overall age-adjusted cancer rates in both incidence and mortality and the lowest survival of any U.S. population group (Baquet and Ringen 1986; Cutler and Young 1979; Garfinkel et al. 1980; Henschke et al. 1973; Myers 1981; SEER 1984).

Keywords

Cancer Control American Cancer Society Cancer Education Program Planner Specific Population Group 
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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag New York Inc. 1989

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  • Noma L. Roberson

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