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Cancer Incidence and Mortality Differences of Black and White Americans: A Role for Biomarkers

  • Jerome Wilson

Abstract

The study of differences in incidence and mortality from cancer in Black and White Americans may provide clues to the etiology of the disease and generate new hypotheses. An identification of differences in environmental and in biological and life-style factors is a starting point for further study aimed at understanding why Black Americans experience the highest overall cancer rate in the United States (Baquet et al. 1986).

Keywords

Multiple Myeloma Esophageal Cancer Cancer Incidence Black Woman Cancer Rate 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag New York Inc. 1989

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jerome Wilson

There are no affiliations available

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