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The Special Education Process: From Identification to the Delivery of Services

  • Ronald L. Taylor
  • Les Sternberg

Abstract

As noted in chapter 1, exceptional students are those whose educational needs are not being met by “regular” educational programs so that some type of “special” education program is necessary. There are several questions, however, that must be addressed regarding the process in which students are identified as being exceptional and how their special education program will be planned and implemented. In this section, these and other issues will be explored. For the sake of clarity, we will discuss three separate components of the special education process: referral, identification and eligibility, and determination of educational program.

Keywords

Special Education Reading Comprehension Achievement Test Intelligence Test Special Education Service 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag New York Inc. 1989

Authors and Affiliations

  • Ronald L. Taylor
    • 1
  • Les Sternberg
    • 1
  1. 1.Exceptional Student Education College of EducationFlorida Atlantic UniversityBoca RatonUSA

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