Advertisement

Bacterial and Host Cell Receptors for the Actinomyces spp. Fimbrial Lectin

  • John O. Cisar
  • Michael J. Brennan
  • Ann L. Sandberg

Abstract

The microbial colonization of teeth is initiated by the attachment of certain gram positive members of the indigenous oral flora to the salivary proteins and glycoproteins that coat the enamel surface. Of the bacteria that form an initial monolayer, approximately 80 percent are either Streptococcus sanguis, S. mitis or S. oralis and another 10 percent Actinomyces viscosus or A.naeslundii (15). That these microorganisms colonize together appears to depend not only on their affinity for the tooth surface but also upon their interactions with each other.

Keywords

Capsular Polysaccharide Enamel Surface Salivary Protein Cell Surface Glycoprotein Plant Lectin 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. 1.
    Abeygunawardana C, Bush CA, Tjoa SS, Fennessey PV, McNeil MR (1988) The complete structure of the capsular polysaccharide from Streptococcus sanguis 34 (SS34). Carboh Res in pressGoogle Scholar
  2. 2.
    Brennan MJ, Cisar JO, Sandberg AL (1986) A 160-kilodalton epithelial cell surface glycoprotein recognized by plant lectins that inhibit the adherence of Actinomyces naeslundii. Infect Immun 52: 840–845PubMedGoogle Scholar
  3. 3.
    Brennan MJ, Cisar JO, Vatter AE, Sandberg AL (1984) Lectin-dependent attachment of Actinomyces naeslundii to receptors on epithelial cells. Infect Immun 46: 459–464PubMedGoogle Scholar
  4. 4.
    Brennan MJ, Joralmon RA, Cisar JO, Sandberg AL (1987) Binding of Actinomyces naeslundii to glycosphingolipids. Infect Immun 55: 487–489PubMedGoogle Scholar
  5. 5.
    Cisar JO (1986) Fimbrial lectins of the oral actinomyces. In D. Mirelman (ed) Microbial lectins and agglutinins: properties and biological activity. New York: Wiley Interscience, pp 183–196Google Scholar
  6. 6.
    Cisar JO, Brennan MJ, Sandberg AL (1985) Lectin-specific interaction of Actinomyces fimbriae with oral streptococci. In Mergenhagen SE, Rosan B (eds), Molecular basis of oral microbial adhesion. Washington D.C.: American Society for Microbiology, pp 159–163Google Scholar
  7. 7.
    Donkersloot JA, Cisar JO, Wax ME, Harr RJ, Chassy BM(1985) Expression of Actinomyces viscosus antigens in Escherichia coli: cloning of astructural gene (fim A) for type 2 fimbriae. J Bacteriol 162: 1075–1078.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  8. 8.
    Jennings HJ (1983) Capsular polysaccharides as human vaccines. Adv Carboh Chem Biochem 41:155– 208.Google Scholar
  9. 9.
    Jennings HJ (1983) Capsular polysaccharides as human vaccines. Adv Carboh Chem Biochem 41:155– 208.Google Scholar
  10. 10.
    Kilpper-Bälz R, Wenzig P, Schleifer KH (1985)Molecular relationships and classification of some viridans streptococci as Streptococcus oralis and emended description of Streptococcus oralis (Bridge and Sneath 1982 ). Int J Syst Bacteriol 35: 482–488CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  11. 11.
    Mclntire FC, Bush CA, Wu S, Li S, Li Y, McNeil M, Tjoa SS, Fennessey PV (1987) Structure of a new hexasaccharide from the coaggregation polysaccharide of Streptococcus sanguis 34. Carboh Res 166:133–143CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  12. 12.
    Mclntire FC, Crosby LK, Barlow JJ, Matta KL (1983)Structural preferences of β-galactoside-reactive lectins on Actinomyces viscosus T14V and Actinomyces naeslundii WVU45. Infect Immun 41: 848–850Google Scholar
  13. 13.
    Mclntire FC, Crosby LK, Barlow JJ, Matta KL (1983)Structural preferences of β-galactoside-reactive lectins on Actinomyces viscosus T14V and Actinomyces naeslundii WVU45. Infect Immun 41: 848–850Google Scholar
  14. 14.
    Mclntire FC, Vatter AE, Baros J, Arnold J (1978) Mechanism of coaggregation between Actinomyces viscosus T14V and Streptococcus sanguis 34. Infec immun 21: 978–988Google Scholar
  15. 15.
    Nyvad B, Kilian M (1978) Microbiology of the early colonization of human enamel and root surfaces in vivo. Scand J Dent Res 95: 369–380Google Scholar
  16. 16.
    Richards JC, Perry MB, Carlo DJ (1983) The specific capsular polysaccharide of Streptococcus pneumoniae type 20. Can J Biochem Cell Biol 61: 178–190PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  17. 17.
    Sandberg AL, Mudrick LL, Cisar, JO, Brennan MJ, Mergenhagen SE, Vatter AE (1986) Type 2 fimbrial lectin-mediated phagocytosis of oral Actinomyces spp. by polymorphonuclear leukocytes. Infect Immun 54:472– 476PubMedGoogle Scholar
  18. 18.
    Sandberg AL, Mudrick LL, Cisar JO, Metcalf JA, Malech HL (1988) Stimulation of superoxide and lactoferrin release from polymorphonuclear leukocytes by the type 2 fimbrial lectin of Actinomyces viscosus T14V. Infect Immun 56: 267–269PubMedGoogle Scholar
  19. 19.
    Yeung MK, Cisar JO (1988) Cloning and nucleotide ssequence of a gene for Actinomyces naeslundii WVU45 type 2 fimbriae. J Bacteriol in pressGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag New York Inc. 1989

Authors and Affiliations

  • John O. Cisar
    • 1
  • Michael J. Brennan
    • 1
  • Ann L. Sandberg
    • 1
  1. 1.Laboratory of Microbial Ecology, NIDR, NIHBethesdaUSA

Personalised recommendations