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The Fundamental Aspects of Injection Metallurgy

  • Julian Szekely
Part of the Materials Research and Engineering book series (MATERIALS)

Abstract

In this chapter, we shall examine some of the fundamental aspects of injection metallurgy. While the majority of readers will be more interested in the practical and economic aspects of injection processes, with emphasis on “What can be accomplished?” and “At what cost?”, there are sound reasons for examining the theoretical basis of these operations.

Keywords

Turbulent Kinetic Energy Mass Transfer Coefficient Fundamental Aspect Molten Steel Biot Number 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag New York Inc. 1989

Authors and Affiliations

  • Julian Szekely

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