Antidepressant Activity of Progabide and Fengabine

  • P. L. Morselli
  • P. Priore
  • C. Loeb
  • C. Albano
  • N. P. Nielsen
  • C. Serrati
  • B. Musch
Chapter

Abstract

Evidence suggests the involvement of the GABAergic (γ-aminobutyric acid) system in affective disorders and the therapeutic action of GABA-mimetic agents, e.g., progabide (PGB) and fengabine (FGB), in depressive states.1–3 The hypothesis of a novel pathogenetic mechanism of depression is interesting on both the heuristic and pragmatic levels, and it may lead to a better understanding of some of the biochemical alterations underlying depressive disorders. Moreover, it may open new therapeutic possibilities in an area where the available medication is still far from optimal. We report here an overview of the clinical data available for PGB as well as data on FGB.

Keywords

Depression Serotonin Norepinephrine Washout Tricyclic 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag New York Inc. 1989

Authors and Affiliations

  • P. L. Morselli
  • P. Priore
  • C. Loeb
  • C. Albano
  • N. P. Nielsen
  • C. Serrati
  • B. Musch

There are no affiliations available

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