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A Model System Approach to Memory

  • Richard F. Thompson

Abstract

Memory is a deceptively simple word. There was considerable discussion at this symposium regarding what memory is or is not. Several participants seemed to focus on what they felt to be the uniquely human aspects of memory. From a biological perspective it seems unlikely that any aspect of memory is uniquely human. Evolution proceeds by small steps—the chromosomal DNA of humans and chimpanzees is 99% identical.

Keywords

Conditioned Stimulus Unconditioned Stimulus Cerebellar Cortex Mossy Fiber Inferior Olive 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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© Springer-Verlag New York Inc. 1989

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  • Richard F. Thompson

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