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Social Memory and Social Judgment

  • Robert S. WyerJr

Abstract

One of the most frequent questions that social cognition researchers are asked by their colleagues (and to me one of the most irritating) is what distinguishes social cognition from cognitive psychology in general. My own reaction to this question is typically, “What difference does it make?” The categorization and subcategorization of disciplines is an exercise for the philosopher or linguist. It is of little concern to investigators themselves, whose work is guided by the specific phenomenon they consider important regardless of the label that someone else wishes to assign to it. Perhaps another source of my irritation at being asked the question is that I have never heard a very good answer to it, and have been frustrated in trying to come up with an answer myself.

Keywords

Congruity Effect Social Information Processing Temporal Order Judgment Experimental Social Psychology Impression Formation 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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© Springer-Verlag New York Inc. 1989

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  • Robert S. WyerJr

There are no affiliations available

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