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Enhancing Academic Performance with Mnemonic Instruction

  • Margo A. Mastropieri
  • Barbara J. Mushinski Fulk
Chapter

Abstract

This chapter describes recent advances in mnemonic (memory enhancing) instruction with learning disabled populations. Particular emphasis is given to several long-term classroom interventions in which we have adapted classroom materials to incorporate the use of specific mnemonic strategies in the science and social studies areas. In these classroom-based interventions, a wide variety of dependent measures have been employed including: immediate and long-term recall tests, interviews regarding strategy usage, students’ and teachers’ attitudes toward mnemonic instruction, students’ ability to generate such strategies independently, and students’ overall weekly assigned class grades. All results to date indicate that: (a) students’ academic performance on immediate and delayed recall measures increased significantly under mnemonic instructional conditions; (b) students reported enjoying instruction more under mnemonic instructional conditions; (c) mnemonically instructed students accurately reported the specific strategies used to retrieve the information; (d) students reported wanting to use similar mnemonic instructional procedures for other academic areas; (e) teachers reported enjoying the use of the mnemonic materials; (f) teachers stated that students appeared more motivated to learn under mnemonic instructional conditions; and (g) teachers reported that students participated more during instruction under mnemonic instructional conditions.

Keywords

Traditional Instruction Learn Disable Special Education Teacher Delayed Recall Disable Student 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag New York Inc. 1990

Authors and Affiliations

  • Margo A. Mastropieri
  • Barbara J. Mushinski Fulk

There are no affiliations available

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