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Intellectual and Academic Functioning in Children with Growth Delay

  • Patricia T. Siegel

Abstract

The relationship between intelligence and academic achievement of children with significant growth delay and subsequent short stature has been investigated in the United States and abroad for almost three decades. Investigators have generally agreed that a substantial minority of growth-delayed children have problems learning in school although theories explaining academic underachievement are conflictive. Specifically, the high incidence of academic failure has been explained in the literature by three conflicting theories: the cognitive underfunctioning theory, the low ability theory and the cognitive deficit theory (Siegel, 1982).

Keywords

Growth Hormone Short Stature Growth Hormone Deficiency Cognitive Profile Isolate Growth Hormone Deficiency 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag New York Inc. 1990

Authors and Affiliations

  • Patricia T. Siegel

There are no affiliations available

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