Ecologically Sustainable Landscapes: The Role of Spatial Configuration

  • Richard T. T. Forman

Abstract

People attempt to improve their well-being. The environment provides materials, but also constrains the effort. This interplay between human aspiration and ecological integrity is an underlying theme of sustainable development and of this article. Alternating changes over a long time span is another theme. At times, technology and organization have provided breakthroughs in sustainable societal development, whereas at other times, environmental constraints have caused social stagnation and human suffering (Clark and Munn, 1986; Jacobs and Munro, 1987).

Keywords

Biomass Dust Manifold Transportation Smoke 

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© Springer-Verlag New York Inc. 1990

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  • Richard T. T. Forman

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