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Unwanted Teenage Pregnancy: A US Perspective

  • Jonathan E. Fielding
  • Carolyn A. Williams
Part of the Frontiers of Primary Care book series (PRIMARY)

Abstract

Approximately 1 million teenage girls in the United States become pregnant each year. In 1986, more than 40% obtained abortions and over 470,000 gave birth, with 38% of those births to women 17 years and younger.1 In 1986, 61% of the adolescents who completed their pregnancies were unmarried at the time of the infant’s birth, compared to 15% in 1960.1,2 Among couples married at the time of a birth to an adolescent spouse, a high percentage divorce or separate while the child is still young.3,4 Most teenage families with children are single-parent families.

Keywords

Unwanted Pregnancy Family Planning Service Adolescent Pregnancy Adolescent Sexuality Family Planning Clinic 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag New York Inc. 1990

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jonathan E. Fielding
  • Carolyn A. Williams

There are no affiliations available

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